How Owning A Subaru Can Save Your Life

What features are an absolute must in new cars? Although the answer to that question is up for debate, experts at the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) strongly urge drivers to purchase cars with new crash avoidance technology. Whether you ultimately end up perusing new Subaru inventory or browsing stock at new Chevy dealers, you will find cars with relatively new, hi-tech defensive systems just about everywhere -- and you should pay attention.

Here's A Look At What Crash Avoidance Technology

According to the NTSB and NJ.com, crash avoidance technology "includes systems that warn when a crash is imminent and others that automatically apply the brakes to avoid a collision." Right now, the technology is primarily available in higher end vehicles. However, car manufacturers across the board, including mid-priced brands like international and local Subaru car dealers, are making more of an effort to incorporate anti-collision mechanisms. When it comes to safety, Subaru inventory already goes above and beyond expectation; its crash avoidance technology, called Subaru EyeSight, uses a dual camera system to stop collisions before they actually happen. Subaru, around since 1915 internationally and established in the U.S. in 1968, is one of the first and only middle-of-the-road brands to offer such systems. Other contenders, like Mercedes Benz and Volvo, are generally known for their luxury car models.

Is This An Oversight?

While many praise Subaru and say that it is jumping the gun, others -- particularly car safety experts -- believe that the car manufacturer is taking a necessary step, one that other brands can and should take. As many as 1,700 people die in rear-end crashes ever year, and the collisions injure another 500,000 drivers and passengers. Industry experts hope that crash avoidance systems will be as commonplace as seat belts.

Subaru is one of the first large brands that is bringing anti-collision technology to the masses. While admirable, the safety and insurance industries hope it is a motion that will catch on among other brands -- and quickly.